The Auctioneer | Jim Smith

Jim Smith

Founder, and CEO

Jim Smith Owner and Auctioneer of V.I.P. Auctions
Jim Smith Owner and Auctioneer of V.I.P. Auctions | Radio Personality on The Jim and Jeff Show | Co-Owner of CarBuyPlus

Jim Smith is the founder and owner/operator of Auctions Unlimited, Inc., a full-service auction

remarketing company. Jim has 30 years’ experience in the automotive industry. In 1998 he opened Auctions Unlimited, Inc., a Georgia corporation. Jim also started V.I.P. Auctions, now in its thirteenth successful year. V.I.P Auctions was Jim’s vision to service new car dealerships with quality vehicle inventory.

He is a Father, Husband, World-Champion Auctioneer, and Co-Radio Show Host on HLE radio titled The Jim and Jeff Show where he and Jeff Stansberry use their leading industry knowledge to aid and inform automotive consumers when making decisions toward buying/selling a vehicle at the present market value. Jim services automotive dealers every week with a wholesale auction which brings dealers both locally (Ga.) and out of state.

Over the years Jim has cultivated relationships and skills as an auctioneer and business owner to build a working portfolio with the best in the business. His portfolio includes but not limited to Manheim, Adesa, Ford Motor Company, General Motors, Nissan/Infiniti, BMW, Auction.com and CarMax Auctions. In total Jim has auctioned Billions of dollars worth of assets through the auction industry.

Jim’s many accomplishments include:

  • Reserve World Champion Auctioneer.
  • Gideon’s International
  • County and local community leadership
  • Served on appointed county government boards
  • Retired Fire Chief
  • Pre-Hospital Emergency Care Professional
  • Georgia Sheriff’s Association chaplain

Current President of U.S branch of Svieta, the worldwide humanitarian nonprofit organization

serving orphanages throughout eastern Europe.

Jim’s hobbies include tennis, golf, ice hockey, boating and spending time with his family. Jim and his

wife, Helen have two children, Sarah Ann, and Zachary and they all currently live in Longboat Key, Florida.

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For more information about buying or selling you automobile email us at carbuyplus@gmail.com or (404)-226-8638

3 Tips for Safely Buying a Car Online

 

This information is provided by Cameron Huddleston, online editor and award winning journalist 14 year in the financial industry.

Be suspicious of ridiculously low offers, particularly those connected to sob stories. Before buying a car, check KBB.com to find out what it’s market value is. If someone claims he’s selling a vehicle at a low price because he needs the money fast (he lost a job or is a soldier going overseas, for example), it’s probably a scam, says Sid Kirchheimer, author of Scam-Proof Your Life: 377 Smart Ways to Protect You & Your Family from Ripoffs, Bogus Deals & Other Consumer Headaches.

Verify that the vehicle exists. Start by getting a phone number from the seller and calling him or her (don’t rely solely on e-mail communication). Ask the seller to send you a copy of the vehicle registration and the VIN, which you can use to get a vehicle history report from CARFAX, Kirchheimer says. Don’t rely on photos. See the vehicle personally or, if the seller is in another state, ask the seller to take it to a mechanic of your choosing, who can report back to you about the condition of the car, says Keely Funkouser, director of fraud prevention strategies at AutoTrader.com. You also can pay DataScan Field Services, the largest vehicle inspection company, to inspect the vehicle.

Mind your money and personal information. Do not give out your Social Security or credit-card number. When paying, don’t send a personal check or wire money (a request to do so can be a scam). Funkhouser recommends paying by cash or making an arrangement with the seller to meet at a bank. If the seller is pushing you to use a particular escrow company to handle the transaction, be suspicious because it might be part of a scam. You can verify a company’s legitimacy by checking with state regulators, Funkhouser says, or ask to use an escrow company or your choosing, such as Escrow.com. Most importantly, make sure the seller hands over the vehicle’s title when you pay.

a Car Online – by Cameron Huddleston, online editor – award winning journalist 14 year in financial industry.

Be suspicious of ridiculously low offers, particularly those connected to sob stories. Before buying a car, check KBB.com to find out what it’s market value is. If someone claims he’s selling a vehicle at a low price because he needs the money fast (he lost a job or is a soldier going overseas, for example), it’s probably a scam, says Sid Kirchheimer, author of Scam-Proof Your Life: 377 Smart Ways to Protect You & Your Family from Ripoffs, Bogus Deals & Other Consumer Headaches.

Verify that the vehicle exists. Start by getting a phone number from the seller and calling him or her (don’t rely solely on e-mail communication). Ask the seller to send you a copy of the vehicle registration and the VIN, which you can use to get a vehicle history report from CARFAX, Kirchheimer says. Don’t rely on photos. See the vehicle personally or, if the seller is in another state, ask the seller to take it to a mechanic of your choosing, who can report back to you about the condition of the car, says Keely Funkouser, director of fraud prevention strategies at AutoTrader.com. You also can pay DataScan Field Services, the largest vehicle inspection company, to inspect the vehicle.

Mind your money and personal information. Do not give out your Social Security or credit-card number. When paying, don’t send a personal check or wire money (a request to do so can be a scam). Funkhouser recommends paying by cash or making an arrangement with the seller to meet at a bank. If the seller is pushing you to use a particular escrow company to handle the transaction, be suspicious because it might be part of a scam. You can verify a company’s legitimacy by checking with state regulators, Funkhouser says, or ask to use an escrow company or your choosing, such as Escrow.com. Most importantly, make sure the seller hands over the vehicle’s title when you pay.